The Navhind Times Archive

Rahul Gandhi expresses “regret” in SC over remarks on Rafale verdict

New Delhi: Congress President Rahul Gandhi expressed “regret” once again in the Supreme Court on Monday for his “chowkidar chor hai” remark on the Rafale judgement, which the apex court had said was “incorrectly attributed” to it.

The apex court on April 15 had given a categorical clarification that in its Rafale verdict there was no occasion for it to make a mention of the contemptuous observation that “chowkidar Narendra Modi chor hain” as has been attributed to it by Gandhi.

Gandhi, who filed a fresh affidavit following the formal notice issued to him by the apex court on a criminal contempt petition filed against him by BJP MP Meenakshi Lekhi, has written the word “regret” in bracket.

On April 22, Gandhi had filed an affidavit in response to the apex court’s order asking him to give an explanation over his remarks and had said that he was expressing “regret” over it.

However, during the hearing in the matter on April 23, senior advocate Mukul Rohatgi, appearing for Lekhi, had told a bench headed by Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi that the word ‘regret’ was in a bracket and actually it was a “lip service of

apology”.

In his fresh affidavit, Gandhi reiterated what he had said in his explanation earlier that his statement was made in the “heat of political campaigning” and there was not the “slightest intention to insinuate” anything regarding the Supreme Court proceedings in any

manner.

He said his April 10 statement was made in purely political context to counter the “misinformation campaign” being led by senior BJP functionaries as well as the government that the apex court verdict on December 14 last year was a “clean chit” to the Centre regarding all the aspects of the Rafale deal.

“My statement was made in the heat of political campaigning. It has been used (and misused) by my political opponents to project that I had deliberately and intentionally suggested that this Court had said ‘Chowkidar Chor Hai’! Nothing could be farther from my mind,” he said in his 28-page affidavit.

“It is also clear that no court would ever do that and hence the unfortunate references (for which I express regret) to the court order and to the political slogan in juxtaposition the same breath in the heat of political campaigning ought not to be construed as suggesting that the court had given any finding or conclusion on that issue,” Gandhi said in his affidavit filed through advocate Sunil Fernandes.

Gandhi clarified that he did not have the “slightest or remotest intention, desire or even thought process, to bring the court into the political arena or bring it into disrepute or attribute to it deliberately or willfully that which the court had not said or meant”.

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